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This Coffee Has Half the Amount of a Lethal Dose of Caffeine

This Coffee Has Half the Amount of a Lethal Dose of Caffeine


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The A** Kicker coffee — which boasts 50 times more caffeine than regular coffee — is being served at an Australian cafe

Also known as the beverage of choice for college and grad school students.

If you’re the type of person who refills your Venti cup of black coffee several times every day and can’t function before that first sip of caffeine, this beverage is calling your name.The A** Kicker coffee, as its name suggests, is one of the most potent coffees out there. Available at the Viscous Coffee café in Adelaide, Australia, it has half the lethal dose of caffeine and 50 times more caffeine than your regular cup of coffee. [slideshow:1685853]​

Here’s the skinny on this dangerous drought: The A** Kicker is made with four shots of espresso, four 48-hour brewed cold drip ice cubes, 120 milliliters of 10-day brewed cold drip, and finished with four more 48-hour brewed cold drip ice cubes.

The café warns customers not to slurp this coffee down because the results could be lethal. The 8-ounce cup of coffee with 5 grams of caffeine should be drank slowly over the course of four hours. The resulting buzz (which is probably louder than a swarm of hornets), will last approximately eight to 12 hours.

“Some people love it and some are broken by it but it’s all in the name of fun,” owner Steve Bennington told The Advertiser.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.


Is there a legal limit for caffeine content?

The answer to that is it depends on the country. A few examples of laws related to caffeine content for food and drinks include the following:

In the United States there is a limit of 65mg of caffeine per 12 liquid ounce in beverages. This may only be for carbonated beverages. (What we call coke here in the south and my northern friends like to call pop.) There is also a limit of 200mg in pills such as Vivrin. For more info on caffeine contents in drinks check out High Caffeine Pop from 'Energy Drinks' Revealed. Also check Ask Erowid for more specifics.

Here is the FDA regulation text:

CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
SERVICES (CONTINUED)

PART 182--SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE--Table of Contents

Subpart B--Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances

(a) Product. Caffeine.
(b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent.
(c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is
generally recognized as safe when used in cola-type beverages in
accordance with good manufacturing practice.

This text is available at the GPO web site. Essentially what this means is that for a drink or food to fall within the FDA's guidelines 68 mgs per 12 oz is acceptable. Some drinks do have more. Most if not all energy drinks are legally classified as supplements. Supplements (vitamins and such) have a much lower oversight than food and drugs.

Natural caffeine levels are also exempt from these regulations so coffee based drinks may have more caffeine than the limit without being classified as a supplement.

Australia has a limit of Australia 145mg of caffeine per liter for non-energy drinks which they refer to as "formulated caffeinated beverage" for legal purposes. Formulated caffeinated beverages can contain up to 320 mg/L of caffeine but not less than 145 mg/L of caffeine.

In parts of Northern Thailand it is completely illegal. It was outlawed as a precursor to meth.