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Whiskey-Bacon Cookies With Pecans and Maple Sugar

Whiskey-Bacon Cookies With Pecans and Maple Sugar


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This crispy, yet chewy cookie is loaded with pecans and chunks of meaty bacon for an awesome salty and sweet treat

This is the crispy but chewy cookie that is irresistible — chunks of pecans and chewy pieces of bacon make a salty-sweet cookie that we’re sure you’ll fall in love with.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 Cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 Tablespoons Irish whiskey
  • 2 1/4 Cups flour
  • 1 Teaspoon salt
  • 1 Teaspoon baking soda
  • 8 Ounces bacon, cooked until crisp, then crumbled
  • 2 Cups pecans, very roughly chopped

Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Maple Whiskey Bacon Pecan Pie

For Americans, November is all about Thanksgiving and even though I haven’t really celebrated the holiday properly since moving to Japan, I still start wanting to make traditional Thanksgiving desserts like pumpkin pie or pecan pie come November. Pumpkin pie is clearly the most popular of the Thanksgiving dessert fare, but personally I have always been more partial to pecan pie. Depending on the recipe, pecan pies can be borderline too sweet, but there are also plenty of variations out there, so to cut down on the cloying sweetness potential this time I went with adding some salty bacon to the top to balance the sweetness of the sugar and syrup and some whiskey to the filling to bring out all the flavors.

Truth be told, pecan pie is not one of the easiest recipes to make in Japan. For starters, pecans themselves aren’t that common in supermarkets so I wound up buying a large bag online. Moreover, most traditional pecan pie recipes call for corn syrup, which is hard to find here so I ended up replacing it with pure maple syrup. As anyone who has ever had a big traditional American breakfast with syrup-soaked pancakes and a side of bacon knows. sweet maple syrup goes really well with the salty flavor of bacon, so this substitution wound up making the finished product even more delicious.

Speaking of bacon, in America a whole lot of people think that adding bacon to anything makes it tastier and bacon-flavored food items (even sweets like chocolate chip cookies!) are a big deal. It may sound pretty strange to Japanese people, but the saltiness and umami of bacon actually goes really well with sweet things (think butter popcorn mixed with caramel popcorn) and in a potentially very sweet recipe like pecan pie, it helps turn the sweetness factor down to more reasonable levels. Of course, pecan pie recipes that include alcohol like rum, bourbon, or whiskey are far more common than pecan pie recipes that include bacon but similarly, their addition helps balance and bring out the flavors in the pie. I had a bottle of whiskey at home so that it what I chose to use, but I feel like it was perfect with both the bacon and the pecans.

Bacon, whiskey, maple syrup, and pecans are all delicious on their own and I had a feeling they had the potential to be amazing together, but I hadn’t made a pie in years so I was still a little hesitant when I first started making this pie. However, it turned out there was no need for worry at all because the end result was amazing! I brought it to a friend’s house party and despite the fact that I fear that the crust cracked a bit and the filling stuck to the pan a little, it was gobbled up by everyone before I could even get a picture showing the inside of the pie once it had been cut. In fact, the host of the party even asked for the recipe afterward so definitely a success!

On a crusty note, yes, you could totally use a frozen pie crust for this or another crust recipe that you like, but this is a pretty damn good crust recipe. Some of you may have heard of using vodka in pie crust before and the whiskey here serves the same purpose: the alcohol makes the crust flakier. Plus, the recipe makes two crusts so you can freeze one for when you will be inevitably making another one of these amazing pies for your friends and family. Seriously, they say you cannot pie people’s affection and that may be true, but you can certainly win it with this pie.


Watch the video: Μπισκότα βουτύρου με μαρμελάδα - Konstantinas kitchen (June 2022).